Well, I started out blogging in French, about the influence of Web 2.0 issues on society. Guess I would like to do the same in English...

@BeerBergman
Amazon lance un service de lecture illimitée sur abonnement | Sophie ESTIENNE | Internet
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

Le modèle de plus en plus populaire de la vidéo ou de la musique en ligne illimitées sur abonnement peut-il s’étendre aux livres électroniques? C’est le pari d’un…

BeerBergman's insight:

Et voilà, la prochaine guerre économique qui se déclare… il est grand temps que  nos politiques et les autres comprennent que l’achat et la possession sont en déclin…


See on techno.lapresse.ca
— 7 hours ago

Sur Instagram, une jeune Norvégienne donne une autre dimension au selfie
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

Le Monde.fr - 1er site d’information. Les articles du journal et toute l’actualité en continu : International, France, Société, Economie, Culture, Environnement, Blogs …

BeerBergman's insight:

#selfietime


See on abonnes.lemonde.fr
— 5 days ago

denise-oeuvre:

MIT THESISReading between the lines: Blueprints for a worker support infrastructure in the emerging peer economy
“Technologies that change society are technologies that change interactions between people.” - César Hidalgo
The normative understanding of work is imploding. Throughout most of the U.S.’ twentieth century, landing a job was equivalent to a lifetime of smooth sailing, but today’s Americans are always anticipating the next round of layoffs. This thesis kicks off with the rise and ebb of gainful employment through the 20th century. It then introduces the peer economy as a well-positioned, future work model for mainstream adoption. I run through the peer/sharing economy ideology before introducing stakeholders—providers, companies, investors, entrenched interests, regulators, cities, labor advocates, strategists, scholars and critics, and media—as well as known problems in the space.
I suggest three historical antecedents from which to draw: 
The domestic workers movement for identifying emergent needs, organizing strategies, and as a natural partner in procuring labor rights
An indictment of legal work status in the US and an exhortation to expand its classifications beyond “employee” and “independent contractor.” 
The franchise dilemma offers legal terms—”convenance of good faith and fair dealing” and “contract of adhesion”—that capture tension between providers and platforms that both groups have had difficulty articulating. These terms are necessary to carry on a truly productive conversation of ethical issues in the peer economy.
The fourth chapter summarizes qualitative and ethnographic fieldwork in New York City and San Francisco. I interviewed various stakeholders with an emphasis on social welfare. Instead of summing up known issues, the chapter conveys how providers see themselves in relation to companies and customers. 
This thesis ends by locating the peer economy within a larger movement to redefine work. It contextualizes the peer economy as one model and articulates the motivation among all stakeholders, which applies across labor models: “The excitement that I have observed around the peer economy—even when it is naïve—is a recognition that now is a chance to do things better.”
[FULL THESIS][Memos during research period]
Advisors:
César A. Hidalgo (MIT Media Lab: Macroconnections)
A. Edward Schiappa (Comparative Media Studies @ MIT)
Photo: My dear friend Jessica Goldfin (@jgoldfin) helped me map out my research timeline, what she calls “scheming for good.” 

Peer economy, sharing economy and the future of work: thesis by Denise Cheng (download). Excerpt.
***
"“The excitement that I have observed around the peer economy—even when it is naïve—is a recognition that now is a chance to do things better.”"

denise-oeuvre:

MIT THESIS
Reading between the lines: Blueprints for a worker support infrastructure in the emerging peer economy

“Technologies that change society are technologies that change interactions between people.”
- César Hidalgo

The normative understanding of work is imploding. Throughout most of the U.S.’ twentieth century, landing a job was equivalent to a lifetime of smooth sailing, but today’s Americans are always anticipating the next round of layoffs. This thesis kicks off with the rise and ebb of gainful employment through the 20th century. It then introduces the peer economy as a well-positioned, future work model for mainstream adoption. I run through the peer/sharing economy ideology before introducing stakeholders—providers, companies, investors, entrenched interests, regulators, cities, labor advocates, strategists, scholars and critics, and media—as well as known problems in the space.

I suggest three historical antecedents from which to draw: 

  1. The domestic workers movement for identifying emergent needs, organizing strategies, and as a natural partner in procuring labor rights
  2. An indictment of legal work status in the US and an exhortation to expand its classifications beyond “employee” and “independent contractor.” 
  3. The franchise dilemma offers legal terms—”convenance of good faith and fair dealing” and “contract of adhesion”—that capture tension between providers and platforms that both groups have had difficulty articulating. These terms are necessary to carry on a truly productive conversation of ethical issues in the peer economy.

The fourth chapter summarizes qualitative and ethnographic fieldwork in New York City and San Francisco. I interviewed various stakeholders with an emphasis on social welfare. Instead of summing up known issues, the chapter conveys how providers see themselves in relation to companies and customers. 

This thesis ends by locating the peer economy within a larger movement to redefine work. It contextualizes the peer economy as one model and articulates the motivation among all stakeholders, which applies across labor models: “The excitement that I have observed around the peer economy—even when it is naïve—is a recognition that now is a chance to do things better.”

[FULL THESIS]
[Memos during research period]

Advisors:

Photo: My dear friend Jessica Goldfin (@jgoldfin) helped me map out my research timeline, what she calls “scheming for good.” 

Peer economy, sharing economy and the future of work: thesis by Denise Cheng (download). Excerpt.

***

"“The excitement that I have observed around the peer economy—even when it is naïve—is a recognition that now is a chance to do things better.”"

— 2 weeks ago with 3 notes

#peer economy  #sharing economy  #future  #work  #jobs  #denise cheng  #research 
Denise Cheng | hiDenise
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

MIT THESIS
Reading between the lines: Blueprints for a worker support infrastructure in the emerging peer economy
“Technologies that change society are technologies that change interactions between…

BeerBergman's insight:

Peer economy, sharing economy and the future of work: thesis by Denise Cheng (download). Excerpt.

***

“The excitement that I have observed around the peer economy—even when it is naïve—is a recognition that now is a chance to do things better.””


See on hidenise.com
— 2 weeks ago

Why the web isn’t as meritocratic as you think
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

Social media may be easy to access, but communicating with people via social media isn’t always as easy as it might seem. Posting content online isn’t the same as getting it in front of them. It may be public, but a lot of effort is still needed to publicize what you post. In theory, social… 

BeerBergman's insight:

And the original article, by danah boyd. Excerpt.

***

Content that is embarrassing, humiliating or grotesque spreads much more quickly than that which is sincere. Just as fear has always sold newspapers, it also pulls people in online. Content creators have started trying out novel techniques to get people’s attention in this world of overload. “Listicles”, viral videos and memes are all buzzwords referring to types of content that is designed to attract clicks like moths to a fire. This raises serious questions about what responsibility we have when we post content online, especially when we’re both trying to attract attention and be responsible citizens.”

***

The question also is, why are we focusing so much on what happens mainstream and very little on the individual experience many users of social platforms have? 


See on forumblog.org
— 2 weeks ago with 1 note

Learning in Third Space
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société
A talk at NTNU March 26, 2014

BeerBergman's insight:

Michel Maffesoli écrit, dans les cahiers européens de l’imaginaire, “Ce qui conduit au refus du dualisme cartésien, celui qui sépare la res cogitans et le res extensa. Il n’y a pas de séparation, mais un va et vient. Au dualisme moderne succède le “triadisme” pré et postmoderne" (p. 27). En effet, tout s’accorde pour s’intéresser de très très près à la "hybridisation" et à ses conséquences pour tout ce que l’on fait dans notre société. Extrait.

***

Third space The idea of third space comes from hybridity theory (Homi Bhabha), which refers to to mixture, posits that people draw on multiple resources or funds to make a sense of the world and constitute their identity. Originally hybridity is a cross between two separate cultures: not diversity but hybridity. Cultural hybridity is a in-between place, which brings together contradictory knowledges, practices, and discourses: signs can be appropriated, translated, rehistoricized, and read anew (c.f. remixing culture)
***

Although, for example, the school space is controlled, it is not absolutely dominated. As Ian Buchanan (1993, para. 21) wrote, controlled space is “reactive rather than active. It is subject to appropriation: its disciplined/dominated spaces… can always be made smooth by their occupants by the act of occupancy itself.” This “occupancy” is tactic. De Certeau (1984) spoke about everyday resistance, in which people undermine imposed power relations.! Kupiainen, R. 2013, Media and Digital Literacies in Secondary School, p. 21”




See on fr.slideshare.net
— 2 weeks ago

To get a fair share, sharing-economy workers must unionize | Al Jazeera America
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

Uber’s disruption of taxi industry is welcome but won’t succeed without treating drivers more fairly

BeerBergman's insight:

Excellente analyse des besoins d’un changement disruptive du syndicalisme. Arrivera-t-il via les travailleurs des plateformes de l’économie de partage ? Article à lire. Un long extrait…

*



See on america.aljazeera.com
— 2 weeks ago

The Future of Work - YouTube
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société
On March 19, 2014, the Open Society Foundations hosted “The End of Jobs as We Know Them? Technology, Society, and the Future of Work.” This half-day convenin…

BeerBergman's insight:

Very interesting video on the future of work. ““Hope is not a strategy by itself. Neither is nostalgia.” @saket_soni on future of work at @OpenSociety http://bit.ly/1lVpme2  ”

***

I particularly liked the last intervention, about how we talk about work in specific (negative) terms, without thinking in terms of passion, épanouissement, work as in structuring your life, and not only as “money, access to, …(fill in the blanks)”.

***

via @hiDenise


See on youtube.com
— 2 weeks ago

[Talk] Tracing the Constellation of Actors in the Peer Economy - 4/16 @ 12pm - Blog of FUSE Labs at Microsoft Research
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

[Talk] Tracing the Constellation of Actors in the Peer Economy - 4/16 @ 12pm Tomorrow (4/16) we’ll have a Denise Cheng from MIT presenting her research on the peer economy. This is what she has to say…

BeerBergman's insight:

More on Peer economy. Excerpt.

***

I lay out the expanse of the peer economy and why it is so exciting. The flexibility of working in the peer economy brings in many people who are defined out of the traditional workplace—homecarers, the elderly, the mentally disabled, alongside the underemployed college graduate. Powering this momentum on a macro level are investors, companies, corporations, scholars, policymakers, and more. On the micro-level, however, there are very real risks, and I will detail known problems in the space, including tax remittance, regulatory skirmishes, liability, and operational costs. 
***
Finally, the peer economy’s expanse is also why it is so confusing. Peer economy, sharing economy, collaborative economy, crowdsourcing… liberal use of these terms have led to widespread misunderstandings. I suggest that inaccurate terminology leaves the peer economy vulnerable to criticism and peer economy users in limbo as policy begins to take shape.”

See on blog.fuselabs.org
— 2 weeks ago

Everybody Knows This Isn’t Nowhere: Designing for Non-Places

fuselabs:

This summer at FUSE, we’ve been thinking about the “non-places” that people spend much of their lives at every day. While this term might be new to you, the concept is surely familiar. Maybe you’re even reading this post from a non-place right now. Non-places are the transient waypoints we pass through on the way to where we are going. When we’re stuck in traffic on the highway on our way home from work, or waiting at the terminal for our flight to depart, or riding the subway surrounded by the same familiar strangers each morning, we’re at non-places. We visit non-places often, but they are never our destinations. 

image

Read More

— 2 weeks ago with 3 notes

Everybody Knows This Isn’t Nowhere: Designing for Non-Places - Blog of FUSE Labs at Microsoft Research
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

Everybody Knows This Isn’t Nowhere: Designing for Non-Places This summer at FUSE, we’ve been thinking about the “non-places” that people spend much of their lives at every day. While this term might…

BeerBergman's insight:

Wow, interesting! A must read. Excerpts.

***

One concern with non-places and the increasing role they play in our lives, is that they are without character, and promote feelings of detachment. Despite the large number of people constantly passing through non-places, they lack a sense of community. We’re starting to investigate what role social computing systems might play in addressing some of the shortcomings of non-places.

***

This app will help us investigate how to design systems to cultivate communities for non-places. Over the summer we’re looking to explore questions of anonymity, identity, and engagement. How do we design social computing systems that allow people to connect, but are respectful of the delicate social balance of non-places?”


See on blog.fuselabs.org
— 2 weeks ago

Announcing the Peer Economy research projects receiving the FUSE Labs Award

fuselabs:

We are really excited to announce the projects receiving the FUSE Labs Research Award this year. We were impressed by the quality and volume of applications (almost a hundred applicants!). 

It is clear there is a lot of interest in this area, so we will be looking for more ways to foster research and collaboration in this space. We will be having a session on this topic at the Microsoft Research Faculty Summit, for those of you who are attending, we hope to see you there. We are also hoping to organize other events in the future. 

image

Read More

I am particularly interested in this research: “Barriers to participation in the Peer Economy”, since I am investigating in this area myself (tourism - Greeters - Airbnb).

Barriers to Participation in the Peer Economy

Denise Cheng and Ethan Zuckerman (MIT Center for Civic Media)

This project will investigate the skills barriers, geographic barriers, and cultural barriers to participation in the peer economy. The researchers will observe providers as they seed, land, and close transactions with customers. One of the biggest known-unknowns is whether disadvantaged communities can realistically benefit from the peer economy. Cities and foundations want to design and provide resources for their communities of concern but are unwilling to bet on the peer economy (or even reject it outright) until there is concrete, on-the-ground data. If cities and institutions can make informed decisions from this study, their decisions will fundamentally shape the future of the peer economy and its credibility in the public eye.

— 2 weeks ago with 1 note

RSLN | Le Web, cet espace méritocratique. Vraiment ?
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

Sur le blog du Forum économique mondial, la chercheuse danah boyd explique pourquoi le web est loin d’être aussi méritocratique que l’on pourrait le penser de prime abord.

BeerBergman's insight:

Rien de neuf, mais toujours un bon rappel. Extrait.

***

Diverses dynamiques qui poussent danah boyd à conclure :

"Les médias sociaux ont mis en place un nouveau paysage médiatique. Ceux qui peuvent tirer profit de ces outils pour partager de l’information usurpent le traditionnel mode top-down de la diffusion médiatique. Mais réussir à utiliser les médias sociaux de manière pertinente demande une littératie médiatique conséquente. Ce qui nécessite de baigner dans les dynamiques de ces systèmes et de comprendre ses forces et ses limites.

Toute ressemblance avec le système médiatique traditionnel serait-elle fortuite ?”

***

via @Atelier_medias


See on rslnmag.fr
— 2 weeks ago

Les STARS de l’économie collaborative font le buzz: Levée de fonds à l’américaine pour BlaBlaCar (Premium)
See on Scoop.it - Web 2.0 et société

L’économie collaborative n’est plus une mode, mais un business de plus en plus ambitieux. A ceux qui en doutaient encore, BlaBlacar le prouve avec une magistrale levée de fonds de 100 millions de dollars (73 millions d’euros), digne d’une pépite de la Silicon Valley. Un montant encore jamais atteint en France par une start-up des cleantech ! Offensive, la jeune pousse compte poursuivre sa stratégie d’expansion tambour battant. N°1 incontestée en Europe, son terrain de jeu est désormais mondial.


See on greenunivers.com
— 2 weeks ago